This Week’s Best Selling Picture Books

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Here is a list of the best selling picture books this week from the New York Times Best Sellers List:

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1. Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site
by Sherri Duskey Rinker and Tom Lichtenheld. (Chronicle.) Ages 4 to 8

“As the sun sets behind the big construction site, all the hardworking trucks get ready to say goodnight. One by one, Crane Truck, Cement Mixer, Dump Truck, Bulldozer, and Excavator finish their work and lie down to rest—so they’ll be ready for another day of rough and tough construction play! With irresistible artwork by best-selling illustrator Tom Lichtenheld and sweet, rhyming text, this book will have truck lovers of all ages begging for more.”

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2. Steam Train, Dream Train
by Sherri Duskey Rinker and Tom Lichtenheld. (Chronicle.) Ages 3 to 7.

“The team behind the #1 New York Times bestseller Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site returns with another fabulous book for bedtime! The dream train pulls into the station, and one by one the train cars are loaded: polar bears pack the reefer car with ice cream, elephants fill the tanker cars with paints, tortoises stock the auto rack with race cars, bouncy kangaroos stuff the hopper car with balls. Sweet and silly dreams are guaranteed for any budding train enthusiasts!”

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3. That Is Not a Good Idea!
Mo Willems. (Balzer & Bray/HarperCollins.) Ages 4 to 8.

“That Is Not a Good Idea! is a hilarious, interactive picture book from bestselling author and illustrator Mo Willems, the creator of books like Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus, the Knuffle Bunny series, the Elephant and Piggie series, Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs, and many other new classics. Inspired by the evil villains and innocent damsels of silent movies, Willems tells the tale of a hungry fox who invites a plump goose to dinner. As with the beloved Pigeon books, kids will be calling out the signature refrain and begging for repeated readings. The funny details in the full-color illustrations by three-time Caldecott Honoree Mo Willems will bring nonstop laughter to story time.”

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4. This Is Not My Hat
by Jon Klassen. (Candlewick.) Ages 4 to 8

“When a tiny fish shoots into view wearing a round blue topper (which happens to fit him perfectly), trouble could be following close behind. So it’s a good thing that enormous fish won’t wake up. And even if he does, it’s not like he’ll ever know what happened…
Visual humor swims to the fore as the best-selling Jon Klassen follows his breakout debut with another deadpan-funny tale.”

 

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5. Poems to Learn by Heart
by Caroline Kennedy. Illustrated by Jon J Muth. (Disney-Hyperion.) All ages

“For this companion to her New York Times bestselling collection A Family of Poems: My Favorite Poetry for Children Caroline Kennedy has hand-selected more than a hundred of her favorite poems that lend themselves to memorization. Some are joyful. Some are sad. Some are funny and lighthearted. Many offer layers of meaning that reveal themselves only after the poem has been studied so closely as to be learned by heart…Illustrated with gorgeous, original watercolor paintings by award-winning artist Jon J Muth, this is truly a book for all ages, and one that families will share again and again. Caroline’s thoughtful introductions shed light on the many ways we can appreciate poetry, and the special tradition of memorizing and reciting poetry that she celebrates within her own family.”

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6. Fancy Nancy: Fanciest Doll in the Universe
by Jane O’Connor. Illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser. (HarperCollins Publishers.) Ages 4 to 8

“Fancy Nancy is back in New York Times bestselling team Jane O’Connor and Robin Preiss Glasser’s picture book Fancy Nancy: Fanciest Doll in the Universe, about the love little girls feel for their favorite dolls–and their favorite sisters!”

 

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7. Press Here
by Hervé Tullet. (Handprint/Chronicle.) A dance of color. (Ages 4 to 8)

“Press the yellow dot on the cover of this book, follow the instructions within, and embark upon a magical journey! Each page of this surprising book instructs the reader to press the dots, shake the pages, tilt the book, and who knows what will happen next! Children and adults alike will giggle with delight as the dots multiply, change direction, and grow in size! Especially remarkable because the adventure occurs on the flat surface of the simple, printed page, this unique picture book about the power of imagination and interactivity will provide read-aloud fun for all ages!”

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8. Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes
by Eric Litwin. Illustrated by James Dean. (Harper/HarperCollins.) Ages 3 to 7

“Pete the Cat goes walking down the street wearing his brand new white shoes. Along the way, his shoes change from white to red to blue to brown to WET as we steps in piles of strawberries, blueberries and other big messes But no matter what color his shoes are are, Pete keeps movin’ and groovin’ and singing his song…because it’s all good.”

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9. Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons
by Eric Litwin. Illustrated by James Dean. (Harper/HarperCollins.) Ages 3 to 7

“Pete the Cat is wearing his favorite shirt–the one with the four totally groovy buttons. But when one falls off, does Pete cry? Goodness, no He just keeps on singing his song–after all, what could be groovier than three groovy buttons? Count down with Pete in this rocking new story from the creators of the bestselling Pete the Cat books.”

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10. The Dark
by Lemony Snicket. Illustrated by Jon Klassen. (Little, Brown.) Ages 3 to 7

“Lazlo is afraid of the dark. It hides in closets and sometimes sits behind the shower curtain, but mostly it lives in the basement. One night, when Lazlo’s nightlight burns out, the dark comes to visit him in his room. “Lazlo,” the Dark says. “I want to show you something.” And so Lazlo descends the basement stairs to face his fears and discover a few comforting facts about the mysterious presence with whom all children must learn to live.

Beautifully rendered with sympathy and wit, this first collaboration between Snicket and Klassen offers a fresh take on a universal childhood experience.”